Media Coverage

Here you’ll find the latest news stories about iHospital, our D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices and articles citing our data. If you’re a reporter on a deadline call us at 1.888.407.5767 or email us using our contact form.

MacBook Catches Fire; Faulty Battery to Blame

2016-10-13

Purchasing aftermarket batteries or other parts is less expensive than high quality OEM (Original Equipment Manufacture) parts…and they work the same, right? False. There are dangers replacing electronic parts with cheaper alternatives. Installing these lesser quality parts can cause serious and sometimes irreversible damage. 

A man from Tampa, FL found this out the hard way. A faulty aftermarket battery caused his MacBook to literally go up in smoke. The owner was lucky to be around when the incident occurred and was able to remove the burning computer from his home without serious damage or injury. Unfortunately, the same can’t be said of his MacBook.

You get what you pay for in these instances. OEM parts are more expensive because of superior quality and reliability of the materials used during manufacturing. Most OEM parts have 90-Day to 1-Year Warranties, which covers defects or flaws in materials. A lot of aftermarket parts only cover defects for 30-Days...if you're lucky. Think of it this way; if you owned an Aston Martin and needed to replace a part, would you replace a part with some knockoff? Or would you take it to the dealership for a genuine Aston Martin part?

When you invest in any computer you must be conscious of the fact that over time something is going to need to be replaced or upgraded. Wear and tear on computers is normal, and so is replacing parts. When the time comes, spend the extra money for quality and assurance. You will end up saving in the long run.

 

Original Story by NBC News Channel 8 Tampa, FL

TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) – Gil Sanderford got the shock of his life recently as he sat down to do some work at his dining room table. Sanderford was on his computer when it happened.

 

As the Tampa consultant was working on his laptop, his MacBook sat just a few inches away. It was charging and turned off at the time. Seconds later, it began hissing. Then, sparks began to fly. Within 30 seconds, Sanderford’s house was filled with smoke.

“I’ve never seen anything like that before in my life. All I knew was that I had to grab it, try to get more door locked outside as fast as possible,” he told News Channel 8

 

He grabbed the computer with thick, white smoke pouring out of it and got his wife and children outside as fast as he could. As Sanderford rushed out the door, some of the plastic stuck to his fingertips. His laptop had caught fire right in front of him.

“Sparks started flying out from underneath the computer,” he said.

 

After he took the computer outside, Sanderford began examining the MacBook. He realized the fire seemed to begin with the battery, a product he purchased at a Batteries Plus on Fletcher Avenue in Tampa.

“From what I understand, Batteries Plus has these manufactured as Rayovac batteries; that’s what they told me,” Sanderford said.

 

He took his MacBook to the technicians at iHospital on Fowler Avenue near the University of South Florida. They told him that the replacement battery had overheated.

“This is the worst I’ve ever seen,” Apple expert Tom Goldscheck said.

 

Then, they offered this advice. “You never want to buy aftermarket batteries for them. A lithium ion battery can literally explode at any time. You’re causing your computer or phone to be a ticking time bomb,” Goldscheck said.

 

“Batteries Plus Bulbs always puts the safety of its customers first and, as such, we take this matter very seriously. We are in direct contact with the customer; however, without having access to the home, the affected MacBook, the charger and the battery, we have no way to further assess or comment on the specifics of this incident,” Batteries Plus told News Channel 8.

 

Sanderford confirmed with News Channel 8 he is working with Batteries Plus to get a new computer. “It’s scary. It’s really scary. I’m just glad I was home when this happened. I know my house could have caught on fire,” he said.

Faulty Battery Sets Fire to MacBook

2016-09-15

It is true that purchasing aftermarket batteries or other replacement parts is less expensive than OEM (Original Equipment Manufacture) parts. The common misconception is that they work the same. Using knock-off replacement parts as a cheaper "solution" can cause serious and sometimes irreversible damage to the device.

A Mac user from Tampa, FL found out the hard way that cheap replacement parts can end up costing you more in the long run. A faulty aftermarket battery caused his MacBook to literally go up in smoke. The owner was lucky to be around when the incident occurred and was able to remove the burning computer from his home without serious damage or injury. Unfortunately, the same can’t be said of his MacBook.

OEM parts are more expensive because of the superior quality and reliability of the materials used during manufacturing. The parts are thoroughly tested after production before being distributed. Not to mention most OEM parts have 90-Day to 1-Year Warranties, which covers defects or flaws in materials. Many aftermarket parts only include 30-Day warranties...if you're lucky.

Wear and tear on computers is normal, and so is replacing parts. After all, nothing lasts forever. When the time comes, spend the extra money for quality and assurance. You will end up saving money and piece of mind choosing quality over price.

 

Original Story by Fox News Channel 13 Tampa, FL

It was a frightening experience for a Tampa man when the battery inside his laptop computer caught on fire. He says it could have very well burned his house down had he not been right beside it.

 

Gil Sanderford is okay. He can't say the same for his MacBook or his dining room table.

"I didn't know what to think. I'd never seen anything like that in my life," Sanderford said.

 

He said he was sitting at his dining room table, working beside his 2007 MacBook.

"We bought a replacement battery because the old battery had gone through its useful life," Sanderford said.

 

It was a Rayovac brand from Batteries Plus. The battery had worked fine for a year, up until until this point.

"It was closed, charged, and I heard a hissing sound and sparks started flying out from underneath the computer on our dining table and then this white thick electrical smoke started pouring out of it," Sanderford recalled. "All I knew to do was grab it and try to get the door unlocked and get it outside as fast as possible."

 

With blisters and melted plastic on his hand, Sanderford watched his laptop shut down permanently from the battery's scorching heat.
"Everything's just... fried," he said.

Sanderford took the remains to I-Hospital, a Tampa Apple product repair company, which was able to recover the hard drive.

"I've never seen anything like this," said I-Hospital technician Tom Goldscheck.

 

Goldscheck warns customers to always use brand name replacement batteries. He said cheaper after market options may be tempting but they can lack crucial overcharge protection.

"The battery continues to get hotter and hotter and it doesn't stop. Unfortunately, this is what happens," Goldscheck said. "A lithium ion battery can literally explode at any point in time and you are causing your phone or computer to be a ticking time bomb."

 

Though these cases are rare, we've seen the aftermath of lithium ion battery failures in our area. Last month, a Kathleen High School student's $6 portable charger caught on fire on his bed stand while he was sleeping. And, a St. Pete man, unaware of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 recall, lost his phone and car when the charging battery went up in flames.

"If we had been asleep, I know my house would have caught on fire," Sanderford said. "Hopefully, they would recall this type of battery because if this happened to me, hopefully it wouldn't happen to someone else."

 

Batteries Plus is working with Sanderford, who hopes to have his laptop replaced and table repaired. The company has asked him to send his laptop to them.

We contacted Batteries Plus as well as Rayovac for response to the issue. Their statements are below. 

"Batteries Plus Bulbs always puts the safety of its customers first and adheres to the rigorous safety standards and regulatory requirements set by the industry. We take this matter very seriously and are in direct contact with the customer. However, without having access to the home, the affected MacBook, the charger and the battery, we have no way to further assess or comment on the specifics of this incident."

Cathleen Stewart
VP Marketing, Batteries Plus

 

"The laptop battery in question was not manufactured and sold by Rayovac and was instead sold by our licensee. We take the quality of those batteries bearing our name seriously and we have been assured by our licensee that they are quickly addressing this issue."

Colleen Orani, Senior Director of Rayovac Marketing

Examiner: iHospital serves needs of Atlanta's Apple users

2016-01-01

iHospital Logo

iHospital is fast becoming the top place to bring Apple products for a full diagnosis, evaluation and repairs. With the Atlanta location at 3655 NE Roswell Rd. in Atlanta, it's a convenient location for most people. Once a free diagnosis is made, the scrub-clad D.i.D. Certified Technicians quickly begin their operating procedures. No appointment is necessary and most iPhone repairs and fixes are made while you wait, with most services coming with a one-year warranty.

Ross Newman, D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices, and founder of iHospital, says: "iHospital does it all. Mac Book Pro repair, iPad repair, Apple computer repair, iPhone repair… from shattered screens to worn out batteries, we take care of all your Apple products, even if the warranty has expired. Want to install a non-Apple app? No problem, we can help." Ross Newman further explains how iHospital saves consumers money: "We’ve saved thousands of Apple products that seemed too difficult for others to diagnose with very simple repairs. Most iPhone repairs can be done while you wait or if not, with 24 hours of dropping off your Apple product. Even water damage may be corrected, if we see your Apple within 48 hours." iHospital is saving the lives of Apple® products in the cities of Tampa, Atlanta and Gainesville. Two additional stores are presently being planned for the New York City area. More information on iHospital as well as store locations and hours can be found at http://www.theiHospital.com This story was originally posted on Examiner.com . It was written by Rick Limpert

 

 

Fans pack Apple Stores for iPhone 5

2012-10-08

Well, Apple fans, the wait is over. The iPhone 5 was officially released today. And, check out the lines!

People started lining up last night. But really, why? Here's Fox 15's Josh Cascio to take a look.

Minute by minute, hour by hour, they waited - even in the rain. For these folks, few things were more important on Friday as getting their hands on the iPhone 5.

 

 

Tony Pomales, "It's a great product. I've owned the the 4, the 3, and I never had a problem with them."

For many, waiting in line for Apple's latest gadget has become tradition. But the question is why? There are plenty of other top tier electronics out there.

Justin Saturley, Operations Manager for the iHospital which services all things Apple, describes a passion for the product.

"When you get your hands on one of those devices, you realize how much attention to detail they put in there. One of Apple's main goals in their retail environments is to enrich people's lives."
Some have described users' devotion to Apple as cult-like. Others simply believe their products are superior.

Jennifer Heinisch "It's not just pretty, but it works. So, I guess it's pretty inside and out."

Peter Jones "I guess a good word is just clean and crisp. I mean it makes it so easy to just find what you're looking for, and it's simple."

The new iPhone has received high marks so far though some critics have complained about the new plug and the new Maps feature. But, at the end of the day, it's Apple's latest and greatest. And to some of the company's loyal fans, that's what really matters.

Brad David "It's kinda like having a Harley. I would compare it to that. You can go buy a Honda that looks like a Harley, or you can buy the Harley and have the real thing."

Justin Saturley, Operations Manager at iHospital, "Just like having your favorite sports team, other different groups of people come together, and it just happens to be about electronics this time around. Apple fans like the products."

It's a pretty safe bet to say that Apple's fan base isn't going away anytime soon. They'll likely be lined up here one again next time the company's ready to release a brand new product to the masses.

In Tampa, Josh Cascio, FOX 13 News

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iPhone users are dropping some serious cash for repairs

2012-10-04

A study released last week by an electronics warranty service provider estimated that Americans have spent $5.9 billion on iPhone repairs since the first release in 2007.

SquareTrade surveyed more than 2,000 iPhone users and then combined the cost of repairs, replacements and insurance deductibles for broken iPhones.

Younger iPhone users are more likely to damage their phones, according to the study. Half of iPhone users under 35 have had an accident.

Addie Alter, an 18-year-old nursing freshman, is among them. She has damaged her iPhone three times.

Each time, Alter chose to get the phone repaired, which has cost her more than $200 total.

“I would freak out,” she said. “It stressed me out the entire day. I just needed to get it fixed even if it cost money.”

Instead of visiting an Apple store to repair her phone, Alter used the iHospital above Pita Pit in the UF Plaza. Alter said she chose to go there because it was cheaper and more convenient, and because there is no Apple store in Gainesville.

The study found that the need for iPhone repairs most often results from being dropped. Immersing iPhones in liquid came in at No. 2.

iHospital Mac surgeon James Franklin Baldwin said about 80 percent of customers are students. He said the top reasons for iPhone repair visits are cracked screens, which typically cost about $120 to fix, and water damage, which costs about $50.

Baldwin said he wasn’t surprised by the survey results.

“No time before now have people had pieces of glass in their pockets all the time,” he said.

http://www.alligator.org/news/local/article_b10bc800-0924-11e2-b7ab-0019bb2963f4.html

Tampa Bay Times: For Apple devices, Tampa's iHospital is a place of healing

2012-04-10

By Elizabeth Behrman, Times Staff Writer
In Print: Sunday, April 8, 2012

TAMPA — Ed Davis paced the waiting room, ignoring the coffee and magazines. He was anxious for news about a patient he'd just brought in, one "he would be lost without.'' His iPhone 4S.

Nikesh Patel, a “Doctor of iDevices,” works on a broken iPad at iHospital’s flagship Kennedy Boulevard location.

It was suffering from a cracked screen, and Davis had rushed it to iHospital.

"I didn't realize they'd have to take the whole thing apart," he said while peering through the window to the operating room, where a technician in green surgical scrubs operated on his phone.

Doctors told Davis not to worry.

Screen repairs and replacements are routine procedures at the iHospital, said CEO Ross Newman.

The "Doctors of iDevices," or DiDs, as iHospital technicians are called, specialize in Apple devices. They perform procedures ranging from cosmetic repair to software upgrades to data recovery on iPods, iPads, iPhones and the whole spectrum of Mac computers.

iHospital is not affiliated with Apple.

"We really are the experts," Newman said. "Everyone knows that when they come to an iHospital, no matter what Apple device they have, our employees are trained for that device."

A graduate of Plant High School, Newman, 27, has always had an "entrepreneurial spirit." He started his first business when he was 12, selling jewelry to his mom's friends. Before he dropped out of the University of Florida at age 19, he started a company that sells sports memorabilia. He also owns a wholesale clothing company.

But now he is pouring all of his time and energy into iHospital.

Newman bought his first iPhone in 2007. Fascinated, he taught himself how to take it apart and re-write the software. When friends started asking him for help repairing their iPhones, he knew he had a skill he could market.

"The lightbulb went off in my brain instantly: 'Wow, I can make a business out of this,' " Newman said.

So he did, and his business has taken off.

In the two years since he opened the first iHospital on Kennedy Boulevard in south Tampa, he has opened five other stores in Florida, New York, Georgia and Tennessee. The seventh iHospital will open in Naples next month. His company has been featured in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Post.

After setting up the corporate office in Tampa, Newman moved to New York to focus on his company's expansion there. The flagship store on Kennedy Boulevard will soon move to a bigger location with twice the space, he said.

"We grew quickly because there is a big demand for what we're doing," Newman said. "Apple's hot. We're hot, too."

Doctors at the iHospital work exclusively on Apple products. Customers get their devices — with the exception of computers and water damaged machines — repaired while they wait in the store.

Five to 15 minutes is all it takes for routine procedures like broken screens, Newman said.

But a job as a DiD isn't without risk. Newman said a lot of people drop their phones in the toilet, although they don't always admit it.

He was repairing a phone with water damage one day when he cut his finger. A few days later, after his finger had swelled to twice the size of his thumb and he had been to the doctor to treat the infection, he realized the customer had dropped the phone in the toilet. Had he known what had happened, he would have worn gloves.

No matter the problem, people are usually frantic without their iPhones or Macbooks, Newman said. He wants his chain of iHospitals to be their emergency room.

"At the end of the day, we don't care what you did to your device," he said. "We just want to help our customers."

And they can usually help for less time and money than the Apple Store, said Eric Linsky, retail director at the iHospital in south Tampa.

"Apple is not a repair business; it's a retail business," he said. "They want to sell you a new device."

For example, under Apple's Limited Warranty plan for iPhones, which is good for 12 months after purchase, damage resulting from accidents is not eligible for free repair. A repair at the Apple store that is not covered under warranty would cost between $149 and $199 depending on the type of phone. That charge includes a shipping fee, and it takes about a week for Apple to fix the phone and send it back. Apple may end up replacing the phone completely.

Doctors at the iHospital will replace a cracked screen on a dropped phone for between $69 and $100, depending on the model, Newman said. Each repair comes with a one-year warranty, and the iHospital will run a diagnostic test on the phone for free.

A cellphone or computer repair shop isn't a revolutionary idea, Newman said. But he never liked going to a little mom-and-pop store that took his device into a mysterious back room without clearly telling him what was wrong in the first place.

"I really set out to reinvent this repair experience," he said.

All of the doctors at the iHospital wear green surgical scrubs, and the chain even has an ambulance to make house calls.

Each store has a pile of broken Apple devices called "the graveyard." As part of the doctors' training program, they have to take apart each device and put it back together again and again until they can do it without any difficulty. They can usually diagnose a device immediately.

Occasionally a device comes across their operating table that they can't save, but that's not often, Linsky said. He has had to repair everything from cracked screens to liquid damage on a laptop someone urinated on.

On Wednesday, he had to use special gloves to get the cockroaches out of a computer.

"There's always a solution," he said.

http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/for-apple-devices-tampas-ihospital-is-a-place-of-healing/1223878

Huffington Post: Broken iPhone? Take It To An iHospital

2012-03-26

It's happened to the best of us. Your iPhone slips out of your pocket into a puddle. You drop your iPad and the glass screen shatters.


Damaged Apple products is such a big problem it's created a whole subindustry:iHospitals, where you can bring your sick devices for professional repair.

The unique thing is, these facilities actually function like real hospitals. The staff wears scrubs, there's a triage area and even an "operating room."

The trend serves as an alternative to Apple's AppleCare insurance, and can save clumsy Mac addicts a buck -- to help save up for the latest sleek device, of course

 

As Seen on HuffingtonPost.com

CT Watchdog: iHospital For Broken iPhones, iPads, Macs And All Apple Products

2012-03-26

The following article was run on CTWatchdog.com

By

As a huge Apple fan and a stockholder, the major issue I have with Apple is that repairs to Apple products at its stores is expensive and the warranty on them sucks – that is a technical term.

iHospital-slide-4

The warranties on new products is great, especially when you purchase extended care plans.

Thankfully there is now a business that repairs broken, waterlogged and troubled Apple products, at half the cost of Apple and with a year warranty, instead of 90 days for parts: TheiHospital.com

“The chain of repair shops is one of many firms that have sprung up and build their business largely by repairing Apple devices. Far from the dingy, box-and-cord littered shops of the past, these businesses have taken on the Apple ethos with slick presentation and savvy brand building. Their customers come hoping to pay less for repairs than at Apple’s own stores,” writes the Wall Street Journal.

“There are about 250 Apple Stores in the U.S., but there are millions of customers,” says Ross Newman, the 27-year-old founder of iHospital, based in Tampa, Fla. “They need somewhere to go to fix their products.”

“Mr. Newman says he can compete. A new front screen for an iPhone would cost about $150, including the cost of signing up for AppleCare Plus and the incident charge. The iHospital charges roughly between $79 and $100 for that same repair, depending on the model. And, Mr. Newman added, his doctors offer tech support and a one-year warranty on repairs. Other repair shops offer similar prices and services.”

There is now a iHospital store in New York City and they provide repairs through the mail.

 

As See on CTWatchdog.com

WSJ: In This ER, Doctors Operate on Pocket-Size Patients

2012-03-20

By IAN SHERR

The patient might have been under water too long. Only a few months old, the victim wasn't responding.

A doctor, in green surgical scrubs, rushed to his sparkling clean operating room, hopeful the patient could be saved.

The iHospital is a chain of stores that fixes broken Apple products but takes Apple-care to new levels, Ian Sherr reports on Lunch Break. Photo: Julie Busch Branaman for the Wall Street Journal.

After thoroughly scrubbing and putting in some new parts, he tightened the last screw and pushed the power button. The familiar Apple Inc. AAPL +0.81% logo fill the screen of the phone.

This doctor works at the iHospital.

The chain of repair shops is one of many firms that have sprung up and build their business largely by repairing Apple devices. Far from the dingy, box-and-cord littered shops of the past, these businesses have taken on the Apple ethos with slick presentation and savvy brand building. Their customers come hoping to pay less for repairs than at Apple's own stores.

"There are about 250 Apple Stores in the U.S., but there are millions of customers," says Ross Newman, the 27-year-old founder of iHospital, based in Tampa, Fla. "They need somewhere to go to fix their products."

Julie Busch Branaman for the Wall Street Journal
Eric Linsky, center, retail director at an iHospital in Tampa, Fla., discusses an iPhone repair with Adam Rivera, left, a Doctor of iDevices., or D.i.D. Earning that title requires completion of a two-week training program.

Other repair shops range from iHospital to Cupertino iPhone Repair in the San Francisco Bay area, to Orlando, Fla.-based uBreakiFix Co. which has stores around the country including in Chicago and Los Angeles.

Apple's own warranties are considered among the best by Consumer Reports. But until recently the company charged a hefty premium to fix broken screens or water damage—all too common problems as people take their beloved devices almost everywhere, even to the bathroom. The independent stores say they can fix devices for roughly half the cost as Apple.

Apple doesn't have any ties to the stores. An Apple spokeswoman said Apple's new AppleCare Plus policy for the iPhone costs $99 and will cover up to two incidents of accidental damage at a cost of $49 each time. The service, which lasts for two years from the date of purchase, also includes technical support in Apple's stores and over the phone.

Mr. Newman says he can compete. A new front screen for an iPhone would cost about $150, including the cost of signing up for AppleCare Plus and the incident charge. The iHospital charges roughly between $79 and $100 for that same repair, depending on the model. And, Mr. Newman added, his doctors offer tech support and a one-year warranty on repairs. Other repair shops offer similar prices and services.

Keith Fredrickson, 34, and his wife Margaret, 35, of Jersey City, N.J., each bought a brand new iPhone 4S a couple of months ago. A few days after Ms. Fredrickson got her phone, it slipped out of her back pocket in the bathroom. "She had already flushed the toilet, thankfully," Mr. Fredrickson says.

Julie Busch Branaman for the Wall Street Journal
Ross Newman opened the first iHospital in Tampa, Fla., in 2010, The chain has grown to six stores in four states.

Once out of the water, the device wouldn't turn on. They tried putting it in a plastic bag filled with rice, a common recommendation, but it didn't help. Placing it in a bag with moisture-absorbing desiccate packets from vitamin bottles worked, but only for a few moments.

So, Mr. Fredrickson took the dunked device to an iHospital.

"I walked in and noticed they were in scrubs, and thought it was mildly entertaining," Mr. Fredrickson says. "I was traumatized and nervous about whether they would fix it."

They did.

Water damage is among the most common ailments for devices, repair-shop operators say. Hayden Dawes, 25, who formed iBroke LLC in Palm Beach Garden, Fla., last year, says many of the customers who ship him their broken devices have had some sort of liquid damage.

Apple doesn't supply parts to either business. Both Mr. Newman and Mr. Dawes say their parts come from China, where most of Apple's devices are manufactured. Mr. Newman says he didn't have to ask Apple for permission to use the lowercase i and had no trouble getting iHospital registered as a trademark in the U.S. and Europe.

To drive home an image of Apple-level quality, Mr. Newman created a certificate program called D.i.D., "Doctor of iDevices," which requires passing Apple's technical-certification tests in addition to his own. Mr. Newman says employees must retake the exams every year, just like Apple's in-store technicians.

The company's six stores have rung up about $1 million each in sales in the last year. The company, founded in 2009, started expanding to states outside of Florida last year. While in training, Mr. Newman's technicians are typically relegated to the "triage" area, where devices are laid out on an antistatic mat and diagnosed before being brought to the "operating room," a workshop in the back of the store that has a large glass window for customers to watch what's going on. There is even a "graveyard" bin for devices to be repurposed or recycled for parts.

Mr. Newman says he plans to expand the chain across the country and to stick with his medical motif. He bought an ambulance to do on-site repairs for corporate clients. He emblazoned it with ads for iHospital, and outfitted it with white flashers, not red, so people don't get confused.

Mr. Dawes started iBroke with an old Volvo, performing repairs at customers' businesses and homes. Eventually, he bought a new car and outfitted it with work benches and toolboxes. Now, he does most of his work at an office with a clean room.

He says iBroke fixes between 15 and 30 phones a week, though he expects that to grow. He estimates his revenue was between $40,000 and $60,000 in the past year.

Local customers, like Ryan Smith, frequently come in to iBroke with broken screens. The 26-year-old student says he has broken his iPhone 4 several times getting out of his car.

"I keep my phone in my lap when I drive and sometimes when I get out real quick I don't think," he says.

Mr. Smith didn't go to one of Apple's stores because he assumed it would charge too much. Plus, "I wanted someone independent to do it," he adds.

Write to Ian Sherr at ian.sherr@dowjones.com

Courtesy of The Wall Street Journal

Tech Check: iPad 3 Rumors via iHospital and Fox5

2012-02-20

Amanda Davis: Well the Internet is just wild with rumors of the next iPad and tonight in Tech Check, Fox 5’s Doug Evans sorts out the iPad 3 rumors and what it means for you, your laptop, maybe even your TV.

Doug Evans: Listen no matter what kind of tablet you have I hear people saying all the time with my tablet I don’t open my laptop as much, and I don’t even both with my desktop at all.  The iPad 3 just might take aim at your television set.

Apple sold more iPads at the end of last year then Hewlett Packard sold PC’s. A first. It shows how people are turning to tablets and away from traditional computers. In fact, one survey says tablet ownership in the US completely doubled after last Christmas thanks to strong sales of both the iPad 2 and the Kindle Fire.

Now comes the iPad 3 set to launch in the beginning of March according to Bloomberg.

Mike Bautsch, iHospital: The screen is just much crisper, much clearer.

Doug Evans: The iPad 3 will have double the resolution of the iPad 2 with a new Retina display screen. Now with better resolution and more online content such as everything from Hulu to cable channels, it’s possible with the iPad 3 more people might be reaching for their tablet and putting down their TV remote.

Mike Bautsch, iHospital: Videos, pictures are much nicer to look at on a higher resolution screen.  

Doug Evans: It’s also rumored that the iPad 3 will have a better camera for videos and pictures, perhaps in the 8 megapixel range. Also, a faster processor for speedier computing, and, 4G LTE compatibility for faster wireless networks.

You know if you got an iPad 2, would you need an iPad 3?

Mike Bautsch, iHospital: Probably not, the iPad 2 is an incredible device.

Doug Evans: Here’s the bottom line. If you’re in the market for an iPad, wait. The iPad 3 is coming in just a few weeks.  And if you want to save some money on an iPad, wait, Apple might drop the price of an iPad 2.

For Tech Check, I’m Doug Evans.

iHospital Featured on Fox 5 Tech Check

2011-12-21

By DOUG EVANS/myfoxatlanta

ATLANTA - If you're giving a tech gift this Christmas like an iPhone or iPad, you might consider an additional stocking stuffer to go along with it.

No matter what kind of electronic device you getting or giving this Christmas, putting a case on it is the best way to protect it.

"I tell my customers all the time, the best kind of case is the case you don't take off," said Sam Schlam.

There are lots and lots of different cases, so pick one that you're likely to leave on because you can live with it.

One that just protects the edges is called a bumper. Others like Speck cases are made of molded hard plastic Otterbox uses both hard and soft plastic. Of course there are all kinds of cases to reflect your personality. You can even buy what's called an aqua box -- it's watertight with a flotation device for boating and rafting.

The docs at the iHospital say any case is better than no case.

They say they've had good success with cases made of a hard and soft plastic combination such as the Otterbox.

"Cases like this are the one, I prefer, simply because when it hits the ground, the hard plastic will take the impact and the soft plastic between the hard plastic and the phone will cushion the blow," said Schlam.

The Otterbox will cost you more that most other cases. All that protection will change the size and weight of the phone in your hand. Again, the docs at the iHospital say the best case is the one that you keep on.

Yahoo News: iHospital® Introduces New iAmbulance Service

2011-12-07

Tampa, FL (PRWEB) December 07, 2011

iHospital, one of the nation’s leading repair and accessory providers for Apple devices, has launched a new repair and upgrade service, iAmbulance. Their certified technicians, called Doctors of iDevices (DiD), now make house calls to repair and upgrade Apple products in a redesigned and repurposed ambulance.

 

The iHospital DiDs can now repair your Apple devices at your location.

iHospital, one of the nation’s leading repair and accessory providers for Apple devices, has launched a new repair and upgrade service.

Their certified technicians, called Doctors of iDevices (DiD), now make house calls to repair and upgrade Apple products in a redesigned and repurposed ambulance.
This latest addition to the iHospital family takes the Apple repair and upgrades centers mobile. Customers are no longer restricted to the five iHospital locations to get their Apple products diagnosed and repaired. The iAmbulance- staffed with Certified DiDs- can meet their customers on location in their own home, corporate office, sporting events or other venues fully equipped to handle all repair and networking problems while they wait.

Ross Newman, DiD, the Founder and CEO of iHospital, says, “We’re excited to unveil the latest edition to the iHospital family. Having a broken or malfunctioning Apple product is stressful. We want to make the repair process as convenient and quick as possible. Sometimes it’s just not possible to get to one of our locations right away. The iAmbulance gives our customers a way to get their products repaired without spending the time to drive to one of our service centers."

Dr. Ross continues, “Everything you could get done at one of our regular locations, the iAmbulance can do: MacBook Pro repair, iPad repair, Apple computer repair, Our iAmbulance team can take care of it while saving you time and money- all from the comfort of wherever you are located.”

iHospital has five Apple service and repair centers in Tampa, Gainesville, Atlanta and Naples. More information on iHospital and the iAmbulance can be found here.

iHospital® was founded by Dr. Ross Newman, DiD* with one basic idea: provide a large range of repairs and services on Apple iDevices and computers with exemplary knowledge and customer service in a one-stop-shop atmosphere. Rather than repairing every make and model of electronic devices, iHospital has trained all of its iHospital doctors and technicians to focus on one family of products: Apple. iHospital does their best to ensure all iPhone and iPad repairs are done same-day; some are done in a matter of minutes. In the words of Dr. Newman, “we strive to a successful and rewarding experience for our customers, going above and beyond when performing any service or repair.”

iHospital talks to Fox 5 News Atlanta about Protecting your SmartPhone

2011-11-18

Deidra Dukes: Smartphones have taken communication to a whole new level. Once simply a mobile phone used to makes calls on the go. Cell phones on the market today do much more.

Jon Giffin: Today, we have smart phones that are a computer in your pocket. It's a handheld computer.

Deidra Dukes: We can text. Talk. Or, surf the web at all hours. But experts say we pay a high price for convenience.

Jon Giffin: Hackers can access smartphones just as they can attack your desktop system.

Deidra Dukes: An assistant professor in the school of computer science, Jon Giffin, says hackers are constantly coming up with new techniques to break into your phone. Often using MALWARE, Malicious Software, disguised as a common application like a media player.

Jon Giffin: Malicious functionality might do things like steal your credentials. We call that spyware. It's like a spy in your password that you're typing in to a browser. It might do things in a cell phone like turn on your microphone so your cell phone becomes a bug that's transmitting the audio signal to the hacker. It might do things like read your location information or maybe it accesses your contact list to learn your friend.

Deidra Dukes: We learn that breaking into someone's phone is easier than you might think. We found several videos posted on You Tube that detailed ways to secretly access the information on someone else's phone. And hackers aren't just using mobile apps to gain entry.

You may be making a phone call or checking your bank account information. We're told by experts that hackers could be anywhere. It could be driving by or a nearby restaurant on a laptop trying to access your information. Everything that's contained in here.

The iHospital Sam Schlam, says Bluetooth technology and navigation systems built into cars are making it easier for hackers.

Sam Schlam: You could simply easily have, you know, equipment setup in a van, and drive next to someone who have Bluetooth in their car, and hack into their system, you know, have their navigation record as well as their telephone record.

Deidra Dukes: So, what are the signs you may have been hacked? Your phone's overheating and you haven't been using it. Your screen pops out of sleep mode when you aren't using it. You hear clicks or echos while you are having a conversation. Or, your battery is draining unusually quickly. So, how do you protect yourself? Experts say do not use common passwords like your mother's maiden name. Be sure to install any spyware on your phone to detect viruses and do not open email, text messages, and video clips. Sam Schlam says there's one sure way to stop a hacker when extracts once he's accessed your phone. Pull the plug.

Sam Schlam: Taking your battery out disconnects all allsoftware until you restart it.

Meet Trevor iHospital's 14 year old D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices

2011-11-03

Most teenagers know much more than the average joe when it comes to high-tech gadgets and devices.  Meet fourteen-year-old Trevor - he's no different.

Trevor spent an afternoon at the Buckhead iHospital learning the in's and out's of Apple device repair. He also became an honorary D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices - iHospital's youngest to date! A D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices repairs everything from iPhones to iPads. Trevor got his hands on some complicated equipment and helped one of the specialists lift a screen of an iPhone (don't try this at home!).

Trevor did an excellent job and was a perfect understudy. He watched many of the D.i.D Doctor of iDevices perform routine surgeries on all sorts of devices including iPads, iPods and iPhones.

Trevor has diabetes and dreams about becoming a medical doctor one day to help other people. He has also been in foster care for four years which has been both a good and bad experience, "The worst part about foster care is being in a group home with a whole bunch of bad kids that disrespect you." He goes on, "The good part about foster care is when you're with a good family that wants to love you, care for you..". 

Remember, no appointment is needed to visit iHospital. Just drop in with your damaged iPhone, iPad, iPod or Mac and one of our Certified D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices will take care of everything. Most surgeries are done while you wait and are guaranteed with a one-year warranty.

iHospital talks to Fox News about the Sex Offender App for iPhone and iPad

2011-10-30

TAMPA - It's a night of tricks or treats, and for parents, knowing the scariest homes on the block could offer some peace of mind on Halloween.

Now a smartphone app allows you to track how close sex offenders are to your kids as they go door-to-door asking for treats.

The app links to the National Sex Offender public website , maintained by the U.S. Justice Department. It then taps into your phone's GPS and shows you where the offenders live nearby.

Tech expert Johnathan Keyser says the app is popular with parents.

"Click on it once and their name, their address, and what charges they've been charged with, " Keyser described.

There are about 1,700 sex offenders and predators in Hillsborough County alone. Detective Kat Poynter with the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office says the chances of encountering a sex offender on Halloween are rare; yet its always a good idea to arm yourself with information.

"Anything that will keep a child safe is definitely a plus. If you have some type of a mechanism like the apps program, you have the FDLE website. All of these are really good information," Detective Poynter said.

It's information at your fingertips that may keep your child from knocking on the wrong door this Halloween.

A lot of parents will be armed with their smart phones when they take the kids trick or treating tonight.
There are several applications you can download to help stir clear of sex offenders. Fox 13 Gloria Gomez,
shows us how they work.

Gloria Gomez: It’s a night of tricks or treats. And for parents knowing the scariest homes on the block
could offer some piece of mind on Halloween. Now a smart phone app allows you to track how close sex
offenders are to your kids as they go door to door asking for treats.

Jonathan: You can kind of zoom in and zoom out see anyone in the area that’s registered as sex
offender.

Gloria Gomez: A smart phone sex offender app links to the national sex offender registry then taps in to
your cellphone's GPS and shows you where the offenders live nearby. Tech expert Jonathan Keeser says
the app is popular with parents.

Jonathan: Click on them once and it gives a little reference their name, their address and what charges
they’d been charged with.

Gloria Gomez: There are about 1700 sex offenders and predators in Hillsborough county alone.

Kat: Know where you’re going. Plan it out.

Gloria Gomez: Detective Kat Poynter with Hillsborough County Sheriff's office says, that chances of
encountering a sex offender on halloween are rare. Yet it is always a good idea to arm yourself with
information.

Pat: If anything that will keep a child safe is you know, definitely a plus, you got some type of a
mechanism such as the APPS Program, you have the FSOP website all of these things are really good
information.

Gloria Gomez: Information at your fingertips that will keep your kids from knocking on the wrong door
this halloween. In Tampa, Gloria Gomez, Fox 13 News.

There are free versions of the Sex Offender APPS, just search for them at the iphone APPS Store or the
Android market.

Steve Jobs Vowed to Destroy Android in Battle Over Technology

2011-10-21

Steve Jobs was willing to spend every last dime of Apple's fortune to abolish the Android operating system created by Google from the market. The Apple co-founder, who recently passed away, was infuriated when HTC introduced its Android phone in 2010 complete with identical iPhone features.

The Associated Press obtained an early copy of Walter Isaacson's Steve Jobs biography and shared some highlights.

In particular, they share Steve Jobs' reaction to HTC's 2010 introduction of an Android phone that shared many features of the iPhone. Jobs told Isaacson that Google's actions amounted to "grand theft".

"I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, and I will spend every penny of Apple's $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong," Jobs said. "I'm going to destroy Android, because it's a stolen product. I'm willing to go thermonuclear war on this."

Jobs met with Google's Eric Schmidt later and told Schmidt he wasn't interested in settling for any amount of money. Instead Jobs told Schmidt, "I want you to stop using our ideas in Android, that's all I want."  He also stated he wouldn't settle for $5 billion - that is what you call dedication.

Jobs' attitude against Android helps explains the lawsuits that have come from Apple against both HTC and Samsung. Both legal actions have resulted in countersuits as well as attempts to ban sales of devices around the world.

Will Tim Cook be as passionate as Steve Jobs when it comes to obliterating Android from the market? Will Apple continue to sue companies that have adopted the software for their phones and tablets? We think the answer is a definite yes - and we're guessing Steve's last will and testament stated the battle must continue on. What other insights will the Apple co-founders authorized biography give us?

Source: MacRumors From Steve Jobs' Biography: "I'm going to destroy Android"

Neal Boortz Talks about iHospital On His Morning Show

2011-10-20

Neal Boortz discusses his experience at the Apple store trying to get his iPhone repaired and then compares the service with what he received from iHospital!

 

"But I really believe in my advertisers, and in the network advertisers like go to my pc. I use pro flowers.
I'm sending pro flowers all the time. So, and then often, and Belinda will tell you this, the sales weasels
here hate me because they come up to me and they say, “Would you like to advertise? These people
wanna use you for endorsement.” I say, “I'm sorry. I don't own their product. I don't own their product
and I don't need it and I don’t use it and I can't advertise them because I don't have the personal familiar
of even what they do.”

"You know, I've been driving Mercedes Benz since 1978. I advertise Mercedes Benz. So, but every once
in a while I go on the air and I just give out free advertisement to a business that I have used. They’re
not paying me to do this and I paid the full tab when I went there. But I'm just so thrilled to find out they
exist. That I wanna share it with everybody else, so I'm gonna do that real quick."

"Sunday I dropped my cell phone. Crash! It's an iPhone. It's an iPhone 4 not a 4S, it’s a 4. Crack! I’m AT&T, I
bought the iphone at the AT&T Store there on Lenox road. That's where I got it."

"The glass is shattered. I take it to the AT&T store there on Lenox road. You know how they have a gate
keeper at the front of the AT&T store? They take your name and everything. The gatekeeper at this
AT&T Store at Lenox road across from Lenox Mall Sunday afternoon, that gatekeeper, that's the third
great, great, great grand daughter of Attila de Hun. She had all of the personality of a tossup possum on
the side of the road. But anyway, they told me at the AT&T Store we can either replace this or you can
upgrade. Am I eligible for an upgrade? No, you’re not eligible for an upgrade for 18 months."

"How much will it cost you? 400 dollars blah, blah, blah, thanks a pant load. And so I left there and I
went across to Lenox Square and I stopped into the Apple Store. Now if you think the economy sucks,
you walk into an Apple Store. But anyway, I showed them my screen, oh that can't be replaced. They
didn't say we won't replace the screen, they said it can't be replaced. Now there's a difference. If at the
Apple Store at Lenox they said to me, “we won't, we don't replace screens here.” That would have been
the truth. But to say “it cannot be replaced”, that is a lie."

"And then they actually said we can replace the back. So I'm holding my iPhone there, I'm looking at the
back of the iphone and it’s perfect. And I'm looking at the screen and it's cracked. And this guy says “we
can replace the back.” Well thank you. Why didn't I think of that: That'll solve all my problems. Let's just
replace the back. I'll still have a shattered screen but I'll have a new back! This is wonderful stuff. Thank
you Apple Store. So, I walked out of the Apple Store. And by this time I'm starting to complain very
loudly on Twitter. And my Tweets came to my rescue. And they told me about a place, where I can get
the screen replaced on an Apple i4. i4 iPhone. Something that the Apple Store said cannot be done."

"So the place I went to yesterday, is called iHospital with the cute little i capital H, iHospital, and it is
basically at the Roswell road Piedmont road intersection, kinda Caddy corner to the Landmark Grill, in
that shopping center, back in, and you walk in and it's really clean it's and they got an iMac Cube that
you can play on, you can play on the computer while it takes them about 20 minutes. They got a bunch
of books and it looks like a hospital because all of the technicians are wearing scrubs with their name on
it. And so they’re all wearing scrubs, and they sit down at this little operating table, and in 20 minutes I
had a new screen."

"And here it is. Right here for you to see, and it's perfect. And it works absolutely fine, I didn't have
to go through the sync. I didn’t have to go through the back up and I didn't have to go through the
restore and I didn't even have to say where the hell are my apps! And what happened to my contacts

and all of that? They just replace the screen. At the Apple Store they said, “You can't do that. It can't
be replaced.” They are lying. They can be replaced. And you know it's a touch screen. It's not just a
piece of plastic. Yes, it costs a couple of bucks but it cost less than replacing the phone. It cost less
than an upgrade and you avoid all of that syncing, backup, restoration you know. Icloud, dark cloud,
nimphocumulus cloud, and all this kind of nonsense. So I just wanna thank the guys over there for
helping me out. And the phone is back on its utter box, I can drop it, throw it around, everything's just
fine."

"They also have a cool thing over there for your iPhone. It's water proof iPhone carrier. That I'm, you
know, I'm probably gonna have to go back and get it because not only it is water proof but it has a long
lanured on it and a float. So like on a wave runner or on a boat or something, it comes flying out on
your pocket and there's this float, float, now in the water, oh there it is just pull it up, iPhone is just fine.
So, ok, got that out of the way."

Likeable: Apple Delights Again With The iPhone 4S and iOS 5

2011-10-14

By Brian Murray

Today is the day millions have been waiting for! It’s new iPhone day! It’s available on a variety of carriers including Verizon, AT&T, and I recently had the opportunity to chat with Ross Newman of iHospital about the release of the new iPhone 4s and iOS 5. Ross is an entrepreneur who started iHospital, a company which services Apple products. Ross was able to give his expert opinion about the new releases and what they mean for us!

Background on Ross Newman

He first fell in love with the Apple in 2007 when he purchased his first iPhone. He became obsessed with how they worked and the way they were built. He became heavily involved with the modmyi community and became an expert in everything to do with Apple. His iPhone purchase led to the purchase of his first Mac and since then there has been no turning back. Eventually he began repairing Apple products, which led to the opening of his first iHospital in Tampa. They work with the regular consumer as well as organizations such as the Tampa Bay Bucaneers. He has owned every device Apple makes and after speaking with him, I would call him one of Apple’s biggest brand ambassadors. He is a developer for the iPhone which gave him access to the beta version of the new operating system and he was kind enough to give me his first impressions as well as insights.

Three Game Changing Features of iOS 5

Notifications- No longer are you interrupted when you are using your phone by pop up block notification. Notifications have been seamlessly integrated into a new drop down bar that can be accessed from any screen by simply swiping down similar to the notifications system on Droids. This simplistic and streamlined feature is full of customization which allows you to get notifications from the applications you want. You are also notified through a banner at the top of your iPhone when anything occurs! When you are ready to check them out simply swipe down and there you go!

iMessage – For years Blackberry users have clung to the all important BBM. Apple has addressed messaging within it’s platform with a great new feature called iMessage. This platform is simple to use and automatically recognizes that the person you are looking to message also has access to the feature. No need for messy pin numbers! The amazing feature even works across multiple devices including the iPad! Rumor has it that we will eventually be able to use it on other products as well!

Twitter Integration - Apple also worked closely with Twitter to integrate directly into the new platform. You now can sign into Twitter through your settings and can use it to tweet from a multitude of applications including the camera and Safari! Now sharing media and links on Twitter is that much easier and will certainly impact the usage of millions of users. Twitter is no longer an application but now a part of the operating system.

The Breakthrough

Apple has the unique ability to see what people want before they even know they want it. We’ve seen this several times including the skepticism when the iPad was announced. People didn’t see the need or truly desire a tablet. Many even questioned Apple’s decision to make the new device. Today many are saying the same thing with Siri. Siri was previously an application that was eventually purchased by Apple. Siri is the new voice operated system that allows you to talk to your phone and have it provide answers. You can dictate a text message or ask it to find you a local Italian restaurant. After a few moments it provides the answer for you! Many question if this will take off and if it is truly needed. But as Ross and I agreed, Apple knows what I want and need better than I do. The only thing keeping this from the hands of everyone is the fact that you need to have the newest iPhone in order to use it.

Predictions from Ross

I asked Ross to share with me the direction he predicts Apple will go and he obliged with giving me a variety of exciting directions. He predicts that we will see the iPhone 5 released in the summer and Apple will return to the summer release cycle. The iPhone 5 he predicts will not have a screen size increase but will probably move away from the glass back we’ve seen with the iPhone 4 and 4S.

The next big product he predicts will be the Apple TV. Not the box that’s being sold currently but a true television that will integrate and work with the entire Apple product line. I probably don’t need this but I know I will definitely want it!

This Post Was First Posted On Likeable

Our Town Downtown: iHospital Comes to the Rescue in Manhattan

2011-10-13

By GEORGIA SUTER

iHospital, a burgeoning repair company devoted to the health and happiness of all things Apple, recently opened its first New York location inside Shakespeare & Co. Booksellers on Broadway, across from the NYU campus. With the recent release of the iPhone 4S, followed by the death of the great founder himself, Steve Jobs, the business’ expansion into New York comes at a time when Apple seems to be on everyone’s mind

Rapidly growing across the United States, the repair center functions as a kind of “one-stop shop,” with myriad services for Apple iDevices and computers along with knowledgeable, Apple-certified “D.i.D Doctor of iDevices," some of whom were referred by Apple Store Genius Bar experts.

From dead batteries and damaged headphones to hard drive upgrades and data transfers, the iHospital is quickly establishing itself as an alternative to the Apple Store, priding itself on free diagnostics and speedy, thorough fixes. Unlike the Genius Bar, there is no appointment scheduling required.

William Sharpe, an expert at the New York iHospital, says the problems people come into the shop with are vast, though a majority of them do involve earlier iPhone models—most notably cracked and broken screens.

Despite being in the heart of the NYU area, Sharpe says the customer base at the new location has been diverse, beyond just students and teachers.

“It’s a really wide demographic—people from all over the city, from New Jersey and Brooklyn are coming in. Apple stores have all been referring to us, even Best Buys.”

Dr. Ross Newman, founder of iHospital, has previously said, “The new iHospital location blends the classic bookstore character of Shakespeare & Co. with the high-tech expertise of iHospital. The combination of old-world charm and literary excellence of Shakespeare & Co. makes this a one-of-a-kind experience. When you combine the tradition of Shakespeare with the leading-edge technology of Apple products and our stellar repair services and accessories, you create a revolution.”

The location also ran a recent Groupon promotion that shed light on the vast number of iPhone users and attested to the demand for Apple service

“We sold over 400 Groupons—so far, only 30 people have come in to use them,” noted Sharpe, hinting at the large customer group bound to appear at some point in the future.

Sharpe added that many of these people may have purchased the Groupon not for immediate help but to have as backup should they ever need service on their device.

In late 2009, after Newman was able to repair a customer’s shattered iPhone screen within minutes, the iHospital idea was born. Newman, who previously worked as an Apple developer and writer of custom software for iPhone and Mac operating systems, was dubbed “the king of the global Apple community” within a year of the business’ founding by several global Apple forums.

Newman became an Apple Certified Macintosh Technician and, after posting a few ads, developed a following in a matter of weeks. He opened his first flagship store in Tampa, Fla., before opening three additional locations. This year, iHospital plans to open a second New York location, on 68th Street and Lexington Avenue near Hunter College, providing further service for the ever-growing Apple product line.

“Our whole goal,” said Sharpe, “is to make it so that people can walk in and get help right away. Most repairs can be done while you wait or by the next day.”

 

This post was originally posted on Our Town Downtown

iHospital on the Joe Crummey Show on ABC Radio

2011-10-13

Today on the Joe Crummey Show, Ross J. Newman, CEO and Founder of iHospital discusses the newest iPhone 4S prior to its launch and what we may expect to see in the new iPhone.

Jeff: Tomorrow, the new iphone will be unveiled in Cupertino, California. We are gonna talk about it
somebody loves iphone. Joining as right now is Ross Newman, who is the founder of the iHospital. Ross
Newman, welcome to 77WABC.

Ross Newman: Thanks for having me Jeff.

Jeff: Nice, are you in an iphone right now?

Ross Newman: I am on an Iphone.

Jeff: Ok just want to make sure you're pure. Alright, just wanna know. Alright then let's talk about this
Iphone. You know we we're just talking about it in the studio. Up until now I heard it was the iphone 5.
Now I'm hearing they’re not gonna call it they're gonna call it the Iphone 4S. Is there any significance to
this?

Ross Newman: Well, you know, they're telling us two different things. Until I can get the confirmed
report tomorrow we're not really gonna know if it’s the 4S or the 5 because we see signs of both right
now. We have a few leaks coming from case spottings over in Asia of the iphone 5. Now they are calling
it the 4S, so we're not sure which one they're gonna show us tomorrow but we know they are gonna be
some significant changes to the phone.

Jeff: Well, like what? What's the difference between the 4S and the 5? And what are these changes?
Everybody wants to know. My iphone works just fine now. Why do I need to go out and buy another
one?

Ross Newman: Well, I tell you. I think the biggest difference we're gonna see is it’s gonna be a (not clear
1:12) they're gonna put the A5 chip that we have been seeing in the ipad 2 which is already showing
about 4x speed increase over the galaxy tab alone. It was just 8x faster than the iphone4 right now. That
A5 chip should really give it a huge boost.

Jeff: Well, to do what? I mean, you know, when I get on the web in my phone it’s slow as hell. So you
gonna make that faster? I don’t think so. What’s gonna make it faster?

Ross Newman: It's gonna make the phone run faster you need to do a little lot more process is run
more apps at once. Open your email which gonna browse that faster as well. Hopefully we are gonna
see a larger screen size in that as well.

Jeff: Oh yeah? But the phone will be the same size? It will just be more of a glass face on it, and the
screen will be bigger. Is that it?

Ross Newman: You know, that’s one of the speculations that we are gonna have to wait to see until
tomorrow. I kind of think that we may see two different iphones emerged. We may see a 4S and an
Iphone 5 emerged. An iphone 4S may look just like the current iphone 4 but the iphone 5 is they do a go
ahead and release that will be a thinner phone, will be slightly larger with a 4 inch touch screen. Have a
much longer battery.

Jeff: Oh yeah. That’d be good. You know what? That’s good. I like better battery. That’d be good.

Ross Newman: I would like that too.

Jeff: Yes, that’s a big penny [indiscernible 02:27]. How about this? Let me ask you. Right now, I have an
iphone but I'm on Verizon which means I can't do, I can't surf and talk on the phone at the same time. Is
that going to change?

Ross Newman: That’s one of the things that we’ve been hearing speculation about. There’s been rumor
we had one of the china unit come exactly that as macro of Asia’s event last week come out and say that
it is gonna support the HSPA+ network which pretty much means that you will be able to use the voice
and data at the same time on a CDMA network. Apple has been saying for a long time that we are not
doing that. We are not doing that. But now, we’re gonna need more and more confirmed reports from
these carriers that they will go ahead and do that. So I think tomorrow we may see an announcement
that it may support that.

Female speaker: Is there any possibility that the 5 will come out later? That it’s not gonna come out that
it'll just be the 4s tomorrow?

Ross Newman: No. It is possible. It is possible it will come out and say, you know we’re releasing the 4S
right now and come around the holiday season we will release the iphone 5.

Jeff: Yeah. Idoctor, that you as, it is kinda cool, Ross Newman everybody. Founder of the iHospital.
That’s (not clear 3:35) as you fix a bunch of Iphones. Is that what you do?

Ross Newman: Yeah, we fix everything Apple. We have about 6 stores across the
country. We have one in New York City on Broadway and yeah, we fix everything Apple.

Jeff: Can you talk about the, I know Patty was all freaked out about this last week. I can’t wait to ask him
this. Now I'm gonna ask it for her. This is great. That Amazon has a new kindle fire and she's just freaked
out about it. In other words, that’s gonna be a reader. I see people on the point with it but now you can
surf on the net on that too and get your email on that.

Ross Newman: You can. The one thing it doesn’t have is 3G capabilities. So in other words, you are not
able to use it unless you are connected to a wifi network.

Female speaker: Well that see, I am like completely addicted to my Ipad. But to me without the 3G, I
don’t think I need it.

Ross Newman: Exactly. And that’s how a lot of people are we could all find a wifi network and connect
our laptop to it or even our phone for that matter, but the luxury we have of having an Ipad with 3G
incorporated antennas. We can use it anywhere. I can be in the middle of a field and use it. I can go to a
central park and other technique and I can use the ipad.

Female speaker: Exactly.

Jeff: Let me ask you this (not clear 4:42) Let me ask you I really don’t like using the web that much on my
iphone just coz I think it’s really really slow. Why don’t we gonna be all 4G (not clear 4:51). I wanna use
the web and I do you know, when I got nothing else. But I think it’s a pain in the ass and it’s really slow
and it’s a drag. And I’m wondering when is it gonna go fast? [indiscernible 5:45] That’s what I want.

Ross Newman: That’s what I want too. And we do know that Verizon is constantly working on it. T-
mobile already has it. Unfortunately, they are not gonna see the iphone for at least another year. But
you know, I think, soon enough apple adapting to the city (not clear 5:17) 4G network and as soon as
they go live with that all networks will follow and will finally have this fast speed.

Jeff: Right. But what? A year from now? Two years? When will I’m gonna get on make it just as fast as
my laptop at home?

Ross Newman: I would say give it about 6 months to a year max and we will able to see that

Jeff: Ok great. Alright thank you very much. Alright, Ross Newman, founder of the iHospital (not clear
5:40 ) Broadway in Manhattan. Just put the check on the mailer Ross.

WSN: iHospital Doctors fix Apple products at the iHospital in Shakespeare and Co.

2011-09-27

The store provides a wide range of repair services for iPads, iPhones and Macbooks, from fixing cracked screens to repairing broken headphone jacks. iHospital provides services for Apple product users without the need for an appointment, and most repairs are covered by a one-year warranty.

"I've already been here about four or five times," said Gallatin junior Nina Gruber, who came to the iHospital with her broken iPhone. "[The iHospital doctors] have been really nice. They got the right parts for me and they fixed it — even though when I originally went to the Apple store, they told me that I would need a completely new phone. "iHospital founder Ross Newman started his Apple repairing business in Tampa, Fla., two and a half years ago and has already opened six stores nationwide. To him, settling into New York was a big step forward.

"Once you've made it to New York, it's like you've really made it," he said. Newman added that he was lucky to be friends with the Shakespeare and Co. owners, who let him have the vacant space at the back of their store to open iHospital.

 

Newman said he hopes that the iHospital will become a go-to destination for students in the NYU community. With the iHospital just a block away from the NYU computer store, Newman said that the two stores compliment each other well.

"The NYU Computer Stores' services can be extremely limited in terms of software repairs," he said.

NYU Computer Store associate director Kathy Bear said that there is room for two repair services in the area.

"With Apple's increasing sales, I think the new repair store will find a good customer base in the area and I hope they do a good job of providing additional assistance when needed," she said.

iHospital plans to open a second New York location on 68th Street and Lexington Avenue, near Hunter College, later in the year.

A version of this article appeared in the Tuesday, Sept. 27 print edition. Hanqing Chen is a deputy city/state editor. Email her at hchen@nyunews.com.

Yahoo News: iHospital® Now Delivers Apple Repair Services and Accessories for all things Apple® in the Big Apple

2011-09-23

New York, NY (PRWEB) September 23, 2011 iHospital, one of the nation's leading repair and accessory providers for Apple devices, in partnership with iHospital of New York opens its latest service center in New York City. Located across from the NYU campus in the renowned Shakespeare & Co. Bookstore, iHospital provides same-day, walk-in diagnostics and service, repairing any kind of Apple device. iHospital is fast becoming the top place to bring Apple products for a full diagnosis, evaluation and cure. Once a free diagnosis is made, the scrub-clad Apple-Certified Mac Technicians quickly begin their operating procedures. No appointment is necessary and most iPhone repairs are made while you wait, with most services coming with a one-year warranty.

The Founder of iHospital, Ross Newman, D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices*, says: “iHospital does it all. Mac Book Pro repair, iPad repair, Apple computer repair, iPhone repair… from shattered screens to worn out batteries, we take care of all your Apple products, even if the warranty has expired. Want to install a non-Apple app? No problem, we can help.”

Ross Newman further explains how iHospital saves consumers money: “We’ve saved thousands of Apple products that seemed too difficult for others to diagnose with very simple repairs. Most iPhone repairs can be done while you wait or if not, with 24 hours of dropping off your Apple product. Even water damage may be corrected, if we see your Apple within 48 hours.”

The new iHospital location is located within the renowned Shakespeare & Company Bookstore at 716 Broadway, NYC. Newman says, “the new iHospital location blends the classic bookstore character of Shakespeare & Co. with the high tech expertise of iHospital. The combination of old world charm and literary excellence of Shakespeare & Co. makes this a one of kind experience. When you combine the tradition of Shakespeare with the leading edge technology of Apple products and our stellar repair services and accessories, you create a revolution."

iHospital is saving the lives of Apple® products in Tampa, Atlanta and Gainesville. Two additional stores are presently being planned for the New York City area. More information on iHospital as well as store locations and hours can be found at http://www.theiHospital.com.

About iHospital

iHospital® was founded by Dr. Ross Newman, D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices* with one basic idea: provide a large range of repairs and services on Apple iDevices and computers with exemplary knowledge and customer service in a one-stop-shop atmosphere. Rather than repairing every make and model of electronic devices, iHospital has trained all of its iHospital doctors and technicians to focus on one family of products, Apple. They ensure all iPhone and iPad repairs are done same-day; some are done in a matter of minutes. In the words of Dr. Newman, “we strive to a successful and rewarding experience for our customers, going above and beyond when performing any service or repair.”

  • D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices, not an accredited degree.

Yahoo News  

iHospital in New York

2011-09-16

iHospital® Now Delivers Apple Repair Services

and Accessories for all things Apple® in the Big Apple!

 

New York City, NY  - iHospital, the nation's leading repair and accessory  provider for Apple devices, opens its latest New York City location September, located across from the NYU campus in the renowned Shakespeare & Co. Bookstore. iHospital provides same-day, walk-in diagnostics and service, repairing any kind of Apple device. iHospital is fast becoming the top place to bring Apple products for a full diagnosis, evaluation and cure.  Once a free diagnosis is made, the scrub-clad Apple-Certified Mac Technicians quickly begin their operating procedures.  No appointment is necessary and most iPhone repairs are made while you wait, with most services coming with a one-year warranty. Founder of iHospital, D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices Ross Newman, says the iHospital does it all. “Mac Book Pro repair, iPad repair, Applecomputer repair, iPhone repair… from shattered screens to worn out batteries, we take care of all your Apple products--even if the warranty has expired.  Want to install a non-Appleapp?  No problem, we can help.” Ross Newman further explains how iHospital saves consumers money.  “We’ve saved thousands of Apple products that seemed difficult to diagnose with very simple repairs.  Most iPhone repairs can be done while you wait or next-day. Even water damage may be reversed if we see your Apple within 48 hours”. The new iHospital location is within the renowned Shakespeare & Company Booksellers in NYC.  Newman says the new iHospital location blends the classic bookstore character of Shakespeare & Co. with the high tech expertise of iHospital.  “This combination of old world charm meets the literary excellence of Shakespeare & Co. makes this a one of kind experience. When you combine that with the leading edge technology of Apple products and our stellar repair services and accessories you create a revolution." iHospital has been saving the lives of Apple® products in Atlanta, Tampa and Gainesville since 2009. Two stores are planned for the New York City area. More information as well as store locations and hours can be found at www.theiHospital.com. About iHospital iHospital® was founded by Dr. Ross Newman, D.i.D. Doctor of iDevices* with one basic idea; provide a large range of repairs and services on Apple iDevices and Computers with exemplary knowledge and customer service in a one-stop-shop atmosphere. Rather than repairing every make and model of electronic devices, iHospital has trained all of its iHospital Doctors to focus on one family of products, Apple. They ensure all iphone repairs and ipad repairs are done same-day; some are done in a matter of minutes. They provide a successful and rewarding experience for their customers, going above and beyond when performing any service or repair.

New York Post: Start a ringer’s IV & get to iHospital, stat!

2011-09-16

A MacBook corroded by soda. An iPhone shot with a Glock. The “doctors” at the iHospital, an ER-inspired Apple repair store, have seen -- and fixed -- it all. Adding six new shops in four months (the latest in the Shakespeare and Co. Bookstore opposite NYU on Sept. 8), the young start-up specializes in accidental damage such as cracked screens, liquid damage and data recovery after a hard-drive crash, common conditions not covered under Apple’s protection plan, AppleCare. “People are constantly dropping their iPhones, i-Pads and computers,” said CEO Ross Newman, whose medical-themed operation evokes a brand of playfulness akin to Apple’s. Despite appearances, the store is not affiliated with the tech giant, but run by Apple-certified technicians. They have examined some rare cases. “We’ve had an iPad come in the shape of an L because someone smashed it over a table,” said Newman.

One of his team’s finer achievements in Apple surgery came when a police officer accidentally shot the iPhone in his cargo pocket while reaching for his gun. The bullet never hit the device’s critical logic board, and the team was able to replace its broken parts. Prices depend on the device: a shattered screen on a 3G iPhone costs $79 to repair, while a new screen for an iPhone 4 sets customers back $179, since the new generation’s touch-sensitive digitizer and LCD are fused and can’t be replaced individually. For a $49 charge, iPhones can be unlocked for GSM carriers such as T-Mobile and Simple mobile. The iHospital hopes to draw in students at its NYU and soon-to-open Hunter College locations with new features like candy-colored iPad screens and wood-paneled iPhone casings, which can be engraved with custom text, similar to Apple’s laser engravings feature. But some students think the Apple doesn’t fall far enough from the tree. “Honestly, I have no use for an Apple repair store when Apple’s warranty policy is so generous,” said student Tom Pisiewicc, 19. Kristen Laffey, 18, felt differently. “I am one person to have cracked my screen multiple times, so I will definitely use it,” she said. iHospital is working on an on-call service and will soon be able to make house calls.

 

Original Article: New York Post

The iHospital on Fox 13 News with Owner Ross Newman

2011-09-14

Commentator: So many of you have one across the world iPhone sales continuing to grow still tech savvy users are finding some new ways to make the iPhone work off network so to speak outside Apple set perimeters.

Ross Newman: They really fring your phone from any restrictions apps is placing on it.

Commentator: Ross Newman runs Tampa's iHospital he says the process is called jailbreaking and it turns out there's an app for that.

Ross Newman: The actual process of jailbreaking is actually a very simple task. You download some software, plug your phone or iTouch, iPad and place the device into a computer. Press the button and do a few steps and it pretty much does itself.

Commentator: The process is from the pond by Apple and the makers of other smartphones but as of this week there's some new guidance for consumers.
Interviewee: It's okay for you to jailbreak your iPhone which basically means you be allowed to install applications that don't come directly from Apple.

Commentator: The exemption coming from the Library of Congress' Copyright Office some consumer groups praise the announcement but it appears Apple says not so fast.

Interviewee: Anybody who does jailbreak their phones as it's called it's going to be violating in terms of service and potentially will suffer some problems and Apple doesn't want to be held responsible. Let's say you bring in a jailbreaking phone into the Apple store they're not going to repair it for you.

Ross Newman: The main benefit is basically giving users back their freedom. Saying, yes, I own this device now I'm free to use how I please.

Commentator: Many differences are actually subtle, the iPhone on the right is the new iPhone 4, the one on the left is an older modified iPhone you noticed small changes. As for the one most sought changed making the iPhone work on most other networks. Ross, believes this might be a step another direction.

Ross Newman: I'd say the main benefit to a lot of users out there is the fact that they can now can now carrier unlock. Having carrier unlock is going to take people away from being restricted to only AT&T and use it on other networks on their iPhone so I made my iPhone have that.

iHospital on NBC Tampa's "Way To Save"

2011-08-31

iHospital on NBC Tampas "Way to Save" segment on WFLAs Today Show

Gayle Guyardo: Alright, thanks Leslie. There is no doubt. The Apple shines in today's marked at
the company has hit what's been labeled by him as revenues earning more than $28 billion. But what happens if your iPad, Mac, or Mac Air breaks? Well, on today's ways to save, you don't necessarily have to find a new one instead head to the iHospital.

John Noriega had found out about the iHospital, thanks to his daughters.

John Noriega: My 11-year-old daughter had a phone that wasn't operating properly so we brought it into the doctors at the iHospital and they fixed it.

Gayle Guyardo: Now, he's servicing his own iPhone and saving big bucks.

John Noriega: I'm probably saving exactly probably about $300.

Ross Newman: Anything that's made by Apple we're working on here, iPhones, iPods, iPads, and all Mac computers.

Gayle Guyardo: The iHospital is the brain child of entrepreneur Ross Newman. Every technician at the iHospital is certified and you can clearly see them busy at work through surveillance videos scrubs it all. With no appointment necessary just drop your Apple technology to be fixed and save big money.

Ross Newman: Hundreds of dollars, sometimes even thousands of dollars and these aren't limited to just hard drive repairs, you also have people who lose their data, we're able to recover their data for normally starting around $49 prices go up a little bit. Also people drop their computers, they spill liquid on them, and these are things that we're going to repair here and save them for having them to buy a new computer.

Gayle Guyardo: So, while at the iHospital looking for ways to save, I also found the coolest new invention exclusive to the iHospital. Take a look.

The brand new, Aquabox.

Ross Newman: We're going to close the window.

Gayle Guyardo: You simply secure your phone inside, so, that if you're prone to dropping your phone in water you might not need the iDoctors at the iHospital. Computer repairs are today's ways to save.

Now, if you're a PC owner there are many stores in the area that can help you as well, however make sure you ask if the text are certified and that genuine parts are being used. But that little gadget is cool especially in Florida because it makes your iPhone waterproof, you can take it underwater with you.

Fox News gets iHospital's take on Steve Jobs Retirement

2011-08-29

TAMPA - It is safe to say Steve Jobs has solidified his legacy at Apple, and around the world. At Tampa store, Steve Jobs is a superhero

 

"Tens of millions of devices all over the world, you have to think how many of your friends don't have one Apple product," said Eric Linsky. Linsky is Apple to the core: he works at Tampa's iHospitals where they specialize in repairing all things Apple. His store wouldn't exsist without Apple, and to him, Steve Jobs has essentially reached super-hero status. "Steve Jobs has been the brains behind the whole operation. Apple is amazing," he said. Demand for Apple's products has created frenzies nationwide and its devices have changed our society. iPods revolutionized how we listen to music, iPhones are everywhere and iPads are being used as tools in the classroom, inside airplane cockpits, and they're even being used in the Bucs locker-room as playbooks. "You do things a lot quicker, more efficient, and more organized," Linsky said. "I think the design of their products is very unique compared to anything else," he added. Mike Garcia's owns just about every Apple product available. He says he's not too worried about Job's stepping down as CEO. "He's ahead of his time when he first started Apple," he said. "He has a reputation for being a strong leader, so I think there'll be a slight impact but hopefully Apple will get through," he said. The company still has some big things on the horizon, including the iPhone 5. No doubt sales will surge and so will the businesses that feed off the tech giant. "As the more i-Devices and Mac products that are released, the more and more things we can repair and work on," said Linsky. "I think Apple is only going up from here."

iHospital Atlanta Featured in Fox New's "Tech Check"

2011-08-25

ATLANTA - The number one complaint among smart phone users is dropped calls, number two is dead batteries.

But, you might be able to help your smartphone battery last a little longer with this Tech Check.

Having a full battery is so important to doing the things you need to do, like texting and take photos.

Are you trying to get the most out of your smartphone, but feel like it's your battery on vacation?

"I notice it more in the Summer because my kids have my phone and my activities are a little bit different in the Summer so," said Stacy Maple

What with activities like texting and picture taking, it doesn't take long before your battery calls it quits

"My battery didn't last long. I had a full battery before I got here, but now it's empty," said Meisha Jones

We went to the iHospital to diagnose this problem and learned that the activities and the apps you're running have a lot do with how long your battery lasts.

"Well, they have all kinds of applications for altering photos.or any kind of games. Any kind of game where you are driving a car. Or you have actual images that change consistently, that's going to drain your batterly a lot," said Eric Linsky

Here's another one -- GPS apps. It's best to plug in if you can.

Doug Evans asked folks on his Facebook page to tell him the apps that are chewing up their smartphone battery.

Tori wrote that browsing and Facebook cause her battery lose charge quickly. Nici writes Kindle kills her battery. And Melissa says it's Pandora, internet radio that zaps her phone's power.

Doug Evans also got some good tips on how to preserve your battery life.

Sonya says switch off your phones wifi, "it constantly searches for a signal. That uses up a great deal of battery life."

And Peter writes, "Anytime I forget to shut my Bluetooth service off my battery drains wicked fast."

The docs at the iHospital agree with that and adds more.

"You should never have your brightness all the way, you should have it at 50 percent. It's not necessary to have it all the way," said Eric Linsky.

And for you iPhone users, here a trick and important one. Just hitting the home button --the round one at the bottom -- does not close down your applications. They are still running in the back ground and draining your battery.

Here's how to shut them down.

"If you double push the home button, you get all these applications. All these applications are ones that are running. So you hold down that and now you can actually, physically close down applications one by one. If you have 20 or 30 applications running at once, it will drain your battery quickly," said Linsky.

A video is on Doug Evans' Facebook page to show the proper way to close iPhone applications. Let Doug Evans hear what works and doesn't work for you in the battle of your battery.

Another tip -- buy a good charger. In fact, it's a good idea to buy a cord made by a smartphone company. Cheap chargers can actually damage your phone's battery.

When you're on the go, get the latest news from myfoxatlanta with our iPhone, Droid or Blackberry apps. Click here to find out more about how to get myfoxatlanta on your mobile phone.

The iHospital with Owner Ross Newman

2011-08-23

The iHospital with Owner Ross Newman Fox 13 News Tampa 813-841-7000
Commentator: Manage your iPhone or the iPod and chances are it's going to cost you to fix it than buying a new one, that's really got you but our consumer lawyer,

Erik Seidel. So, there's another option.

Erik Seidel: They call them the iPhone King.

Ross Newman: It's probably the most popular device out there.

Erik Seidel: An obsession that started when he got his first iPhone.

Ross Newman: Being the kind of person I am, I dove into it immediately.

Erik Seidel: Ross Newman learned everything there was to know about iPhones including how to take them apart and fix them.

Ross Newman: We replace this entire part, inside of this which then makes this look like a brand new phone again.

Erik Seidel: That led Ross to open what he now calls, the iHospital.

Ross Newman: I came with the service because we needed an easy solution to get your phone fixed and there really wasn't any.

Erik Seidel: So, he opened one and they came. Customers like, Stephani Heirshberg.
Stephani Heirshberg: Even I'm on that jetski over the weekend and it got saltwater in it so it completely died.

Erik Seidel: She says Apple wanted nearly $400 to replace her phone. So, she came here.

Stephani Heirshberg: He was able to fix the one part that got saltwater on it.

Erik Seidel: The final charge just $75.

Ross Newman: We don't have a single repair that's over $100 here.

Erik Seidel: Since opening this Tampa location last month, Ross, has seen iTragedies of every kind.

Ross Newman: We've had a few of these officers who have dropped them like chasing suspects; I had one who shot his phone.

Erik Seidel: CPA Neil Fabricant says he doesn't have time to wait for his phone service wrecked to get back to him.

Neil Fabricant: Unfortunately, they're incredibly busy right now. We know exactly what's wrong the second we see it and what to do.

Erik Seidel: Destroy display? No problem.

Ross Newman: Before you take out the display, we have to remove the LCD on the back of it and replace this entire part.

Erik Seidel: All with the one year warranty. In fact, Ross fixes all things Apple from iPods and Pads to laptops themselves leaving customers like Stephani keeping him on speed dial.

Stephani Heirshberg: It's within 15 minutes, it was fixed and charged up and ready to go.

Erik Seidel: Erik Seidel Fox 13 News.

Tech Check: iHospital Opens in Atlanta

2011-07-13

ATLANTA - They say an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but that's not true at the iHospital. In this Tech Check, FOX 5's Doug Evans reports on the new hospital that has opened its doors for broken Apple products.

The iHospital just opened in Atlanta, and they're already seeing disasters ranging from broken iPad screens to cracked iPhones. The doctors at the iHospital specialize in iSurgery, and they say repairs to iPhone screens and battery troubles are their most common complaints.

If you have a broken Apple product, the iHospital says it's a good alternative to sending the product back to Apple—especially if the device is out of warranty. The turnaround is usually a couple of hours—and at worst, a couple of days—at the iHospital, compared to four to six weeks with Apple.

iHospital also claims their repairs are less expensive. They use genuine Apple replacement parts, which protects your warranty with Apple.

But the best advice for protecting your Apple device? Buy a case—a very good case. Experts at the iHospital recommend the OtterBox . It's almost twice as expensive as a regular iPhone case, but if you drop your phone, experts claim it's strong enough to keep it protected.

The iHospital first started in Tampa. Atlanta's is the second location, and the company says it will be expanding to other U.S. cities soon.

iHospital on Bubba the Love Sponge

2011-07-13

I can't say enough good things, finally, I know that you've been out of the iHospital and I know that you know they've taken care some of your stuff and I've never really had a need to go down there until my home button on my iPhone.

Bubba the Love Sponge® and Spice talk about iHospital® on the BTLS morning show July 13th, 2011. The iHospital has locations in Tampa, Atlanta, Gainesville, Tennessee, and New York City. iHospital is the leader in Apple ® iPhone® Repair, Mac® Repair, Macbook® Repair, iPad® Repair, and iPod® Repair.

Bubba: Spice, I can't say enough good things, finally, I know that you've been out of the iHospital and I know that you know they've taken care some of your stuff and I've never really had a need to go down there until my home button on my iPhone.

Just 'cause that's the most commonly smashed button and I have to smash it like 6, 7, 8, 12 times to get it back to go to the you know where I was going and so I called the genius lab or the genius bar and like we don't replace internal parts and their fancy way of saying, you need to buy a new phone, right? So, I called Ross, he said, we go down to the iHospital which Spice, you've been there a couple of times have you not?

Spice: Yeah, I've went there one time 'cause my screen was got off and they fix them 2 seconds.

Bubba: You wouldn't believe, so they actually took me in the back and they got like I mean a lot of people think when you shatter your screen on your iPhone. By the way, whether it's an iPad or an iPod, an iPhone 3, 4 or you need a fancy case, any accessories, chargers, it's right there on I think Kennedy, yeah, and you can go to theiHospital.com for more information. I think they have a store in Atlanta now, in two weeks they got one in North Tampa on Florida on Brisby Down for USF people, they got one in Gainesville opening soon and New York City. Spice, you know that you're on to something when you can open something up to New York City and know that you're going to be okay.

Spice: For sure.

Bubba: They fix all Apple products, Mac's, iPads, iPods, iPhones. So, I have this home button deal and you won't believe, Spice actually it was my decent skid. You know my decent channel 10 guy?

Spice: Yeah.

Bubba: His son works there.

Spice: I didn't know that.

Bubba: Yeah, big kid. Tomorrow's his birthday too, by the way, happy birthday to you little DC. So, he takes my iPhone a 100 percent apart I mean it looks like somebody just took it against the wall, Bubba had a Rebecca meltdown and I threw it against the wall and end in pieces. I guess the home button is something that Apple per se will not replace. So, they gone in the back and they have a bag full of brand new home button, they do.

Spice: It's fell off a truck.

Bubba: Yeah, and he puts the new home button and he's like, while we're here, Ross that's why we're in it, let's put a new screen on it as well. So, you don't understand that guy refurb my phone and you know my phone has a got a ton mileage on it as yours does.

Spice: Yes, you have a done deal now.

Bubba: So, yeah, man, I'll tell you and unlike you know when you go to the genius lab or the genius bar or whatever hell was called and they talked down your neck and this is like very non-invasive. Just roll up in there say my phone's messed up and you can see the technicians in the back fixing it. It's awesome.

Spice: Yeah.

Bubba: Just because they don't treat you like you're a jobber, they don't treat you like you know they have when you walk up in there, they actually want your business.

iHospital on Bubba the Love Sponge Morning Show

2011-04-11

Speaking of the iHospital, I didn't know that they work on iPods and iPads so basically anything Mac?


Bubba: So Spice, the thing about meeting on time, I don't think an iPod is made to be smashed you know this many times a day.

Spice: Repeatedly?

Bubba: Yeah.

Spice: Well, you know we always going to take it.

Bubba: Seriously?

Spice: Yeah, we take them to the iHospital so that they can fix it.

Bubba: No, seriously.

Spice: Yeah, they're working all that stuff.

Bubba: They're working on iPods too?

Spice: Yeah, yeah.

Bubba: Because now sometimes it'll pause and even a little two bars are up it's still not pause it at times. Speaking of the iHospital I didn't know that they work on iPods and iPads so basically anything Mac?

Spice: Yeah, exactly. Even your Macbook.

Bubba: Like a laptop?

Spice: Yeah.

Bubba: Really?

Spice: Yeah. If there's some problem and they can fix it, they will.

Bubba: I'm a tell you, man, I have my old iPhone that I gave to my stepbrother, Julie right?

Spice: Yeah and that's old.

Bubba: And it's like you know two years old maybe older 'cause I got a new one you know in the last Summer or whenever and I gave that to her for her birthday and she was happy. And I ran it through the mail and so you know she probably has this well, well all of a sudden it just wouldn't power up or what have not so I took it like of the guy requested. I took it to the genius bar or wherever you dispose it, the Mac store, right? It's the genius lab?

Spice: Yeah, the genius bar.

Bubba: Yeah, well, I didn't make an appointment I sent a grant wrestles little guy to do it comes back from Apple and says the motherboard's nothing you can do about it. You can't do nothing, you're going to buy a new phone. Well, it's like you know what let me just send it down the iHospital because another they did something for you and so I send it down there and guess what, they're like yeah the motherboard is burned out but we can put a new one on there and it's about half as much as a regular phone.

Spice: That's easy enough.

Bubba: So, you know Apple wanted to upsell me to you know the all new phone, the all new this, and all new that and iHospital is like I don't think it was like $65.

Spice: Perfect.

Bubba: A new phone's like what $150?

Spice: Yes, something like that. I don't mind like running super slow. I don't even know what to do about it so I probably going to remind there too because you know if you go to the Mac's just probably going to upsell me.

Bubba: I'm going to try take my iPhone over there as well because my button like I think I'm wearing a crap on mine, they'll put a new button in there for you.

Spice: Sweet.

Bubba: I got to confess I haven't been down there I just send people down there for me.

Spice: You know, I think they're actually they opened one up in the Atlanta area so if you're on a country and you're listening but here locally it's right on west shore in Kennedy basically.

Bubba: Kind above the 0:02:34.3 [inaudible].

Spice: Exactly, yeah.

Bubba: In that pause or down a little bit?

Spice: Down just a tat.

Bubba: Like on a steam along?

Spice: No, it's in a plaza but just right down the road from that.

Bubba: West shore in Kennedy, man, if he's not really Mac based. Don't think about going to the genius labs so that they can tell you that you need a new one and you're an idiot. Just go right to the iHospital, it saved me 50 percent. I didn't need a new phone I just needed a new motherboard. They were able to do it in a day. Love those guys, man. Thank you so much.

iHospital - Fox News Verizon & AT&T iPhone

2011-02-10

Ross Newman talks about the difference in AT&T's iPhone and Verizon's iPhone reception.

To clear the air in this sailor sibling rivalry we set out to test these enemy carriers side-by-side. So, we've hooked up with the iPhone Hospital in Tampa.

Ross: Hey Chris, how's it going?

Chris: How you doing?

Chris: Ross helps me out because he is plugged in and I'm cheap. My mobile is seriously old.

Ross: Fully extended antenna. Now you're going to do single test with that and this.

Chris: For my temporary upgrade I borrowed one AT&T iPhone and one Verizon iPhone.

Ross: You're going to see, what you need an idea for how both networks work around town. So far, right now Verizon and AT&T both have about same signal strength.

Chris: On first glance they're almost identical.

Ross: They look pretty much of the same.

Chris: Luckily, for our trial.

Ross: This switch.

Chris: These two are different colors so we don't confuse competitors.

Ross: You're going to have AT&T as the white, the black is Verizon.

Chris: With that, it's time to go for our unscientific test we hop in the jeep. Here we go. Place the phones next to one another and drive around Tampa. On signal strength, we find good but not 100 percent performance on both. Verizon boasts better coverage than AT&T.

iHospital featured on the Bubba the Love Sponge Show on Sirius Radio

2010-11-30

"Those who have iPhones have had one problem or another and it's just happens. I think you'd rather go get a root canal than go to the genius factory or whatever it's called."

Bubba: Spice, yesterday you had a little bit of a situation. We've all had this situation and I know that you don't want to be a surround. Those who have iPhones have had one problem or another and it's just happens. I think you'd rather go get a root canal than go to the genius factory or whatever it's called.

Spice: The genius bar, please.

Bubba: If somebody was to able to spend a few minutes with Steve Jobs, the CEO of Apple, if they would say that you got a great thing going on but the way that your genius lab or genius bars treats your customer service or your repair division of apple it's just it talks down to people.

Spice: Yeah, look, I mean sorry we're not always smart as everybody that works in
an Apple store. I apologize I have a phone made by your company I need to get it fix. Well, I can't just walk in there and get it fixed. I have to go online. I have to make an appointment. I've got to show up early for my appointment make sure I'm on time and make sure I check in and all this kind of crap and chances are they're just going to tell me I need a new phone anyways and it's going to cost me couple hundred bucks.

Bubba: And you're an idiot.

Spice: Yeah, and then they're going to tell you, you're an idiot, move.

Bubba: So anyway, Spice had a problem with his iPhone. What was the problem that you have?

Spice: Well, what happened was I dropped it the previous night and the LCD screen that got messed up. So just the screen it went blank on me so literally I had no phone access which was driving me insane.

Bubba: Right. Much either problem that I had when all of sudden my sim card just kept saying no sim, no sim, no sim and I have to reset my call.

Spice: Well, you're exactly right, yeah.

Bubba: So, you have a problem with your iPhone.

Spice: Yeah, problem on my iPhone. I've had this problem with my last one, actually and I took it to the genius bar or whatever they call it and they took one look at it, well, you're going to buy new one. So, it cost me two hundred bucks or whatever to get a new one and I didn't question it I just go up. I guess that's cost doing business and move on. But so yesterday I actually questioned it in someplace.

Bubba: Yeah, Ross who kept the place called iHospital.com. Now, not only is an online deal so if you live outside of Tampa you know you can send it in or I guess but it's physical store as well. And I asked you about on the breaking like you know what I don't really want to talk about it because I have so many wonderful things to say about this place. It's such a breath of fresh air, I rather save it on air so be it.

Spice: It just really was nice because again my LCD screen was messed up and I don't know if I need a new phone or not so I brought it in there and you know everybody super friendly and they're like, "Okay what's the problem?" I go okay well my screen here it goes. "Okay cool. I'll be right back. Give me about 5 minutes." So, literally took my phone back there brought it out no more than 5 minutes later and knew all the place is busy. I mean it had a lot of customers in there. Brought about 5 minutes later, people are friendly, courteous and the whole thing is fixed like brand new.

The iHospital Owner Ross Newman on Fox Good Day Tampa Bay

2010-09-14

The iHospital with Owner Ross Newman Fox Good Day Tampa Bay 813-841-7000

 

Commentator: When you're in a bit under the weather you just pick up the phone you call your doctor but what happens when your iPhone is sick. Ross Newman is the iPhone doctor and he joins us from the iHospital. Good to see you. How you've been, man?

Ross Newman: Good, how are you?

Commentator: I'm good. Thank you. Okay. If you don't want to go wait in line, you don't want to go to the genius bar at the Apple store we can come to your place, right?

Ross Newman: That's correct. Come on down we can help with just about anything that you have that's Apple.

Commentator: Okay, so I accidentally dropped my iPhone into the toilet and it gets water in it. How much you're going to charge me to fix it?

Ross Newman: You know we don't have a flat rate for water damage but I tell you that lots of time it's going to be cheaper than what's going to cost to buy a new phone so you ship it down and let's take a look at it 'cause we can fix it about probably 9 out of 10 times.

Commentator: What if I am living the Gemini, leave my iPhone on the roof of my car when I'm backing out and it falls and it cracks the screen? That happened to me by the way.

Ross Newman: That's exactly what happened right here to the new iPhone 4.

Commentator: Really?

Ross Newman: So, we bring it in and that is it's exactly what happens. It happens all the time these phones, people will leave them on the roof of their car and just drop them and go fly and you see they break the front and the back of them but it doesn't take much for us to fix because we get it brand new again within a matter of 15 to 30 minutes.

Commentator: Ross, are you telling me you can fix that broken phone like that?

Ross Newman: Oh, yeah, we can fix it and we can fix them pretty quickly.

Commentator: And how much for that fix cost?

Ross Newman: On the iPhone 4 it's a little bit more than other repairs cost or some many different features inside the iPhone 4, it cost a little bit more to fix but that repairs about $179. It's still cheaper than Apple and you're going to keep all your data on the phone as well.

Commentator: So, as bad as that phone looked that you were just showing us, that phone is fixable and it's going to be working fine in just a little time?

Ross Newman: Exactly.

Commentator: Tell me some of the worst things you've seen across that have come in the door.

Ross Newman: Some of the worst that have come in the door you know we've had a lot of cops who dropped their phones chasing different criminals. Couple of different people who've been in Busch Gardens dropping their phones off roller coasters but in really bad shape but you know we get them working again.

Commentator: I'm surprised they even were able to find them and I saw the iPad there, is it all things Apple you fix there not just iPhones?

Ross Newman: It's everything Apple. I tell you we do a lot of Macintosh computer repairs here. A lot of failing hard drives, these hard drives in any computer they go bad, they fail and you can lose all your data but we have a great team here that can recover data off pretty much any hard drive, any Mac computer and recover all the data put a brand new hard drive and at same the day and get you up and speed back running again.

Commentator: Hey, we got to go but I got to tell people I know that the boys already done a story on you along the way and I know a lot of people have seen this story watch it here Fox 13 and they found you guys. We're awfully glad we've been able to show you off a little bit, okay.

Ross Newman: Thank you as well.

Commentator: Alright, we'll tell everybody in case you don't know the iHospital is at 4530 West Kennedy Boulevard and if the phone is working and you want to give them a call the number is (813) 841-7000.